Posted tagged ‘Kansas’

Meet a Member: Wilma Moore-Black

August 25, 2016

One of the Kansas members ready to welcome NFPW members to Wichita is Wilma Moore-Black. Wilma was national co-membership director while I was NFPW president. She has spent the last year helping with preparations for this year’s national conference in her hometown of Wichita. Meet another unique and unbelievable NFPW member I am honored to call a friend.

Wilma Moore-Black is a hat lady. You will see her in all types of hats, especially a red one and cowboy hats. I was wearing my Jerusalem hat on "hat day" at my church Unity of Wichita. She purchased the hat in Jerusalem during a 2014 trip to Israel and Jerusalem with church members and friends of LOV Ministries of Dallas.

Wilma Moore-Black is a hat lady. You will see her in all types of hats, especially a red one and cowboy hats. She purchased this hat in Jerusalem during a 2014 trip to Israel and Jerusalem with church members and friends of LOV Ministries of Dallas.

Name:  Wilma Moore-Black

City and State: Wichita, Kansas

Affiliate and any leadership positions: Kansas

Years a member of NFPW: 10 according to NFPW, but my records for membership while in Norfolk, Virginia from 1973 to 1980 with a byline of Wilma Tillis at The Ledger Star cannot be located. I think it’s more like about 17 years.

Tell us a little about you.

My name is special. You’ll remember when you think of the beautiful, intelligent woman who is married to Fred Flintsone? (Wilma). Why settle for less in life when you can get more? (Moore-my maiden name) and the beautiful color I possess is? (Black-my spouse’s surname). You’ve now met Wilma Moore-Black. I’m unique. I know that I make a difference in this lifetime and with anyone I meet. It’s my job to make sure that you realize, accept and learn to promote the best about yourself after you’ve met me. I’m a trailblazer and a change agent in my own right.

Wilma Moore-Black met Mr. Louis Gossett Jr., before she presented a speech at a luncheon sponsored by the National Association of Black Journalist last year in Minneapolis. Her speech won a national award in this year's communications contest. Her speech was titled "Mr. Gordon Parks: A Genius Whose Legacy Lives On in Kansas and Worldwide."

Wilma Moore-Black met Mr. Louis Gossett Jr., before she presented a speech at a luncheon sponsored by the National Association of Black Journalist last year in Minneapolis. Her speech won a national award in this year’s communications contest. Her speech was titled “Mr. Gordon Parks: A Genius Whose Legacy Lives On in Kansas and Worldwide.”

Journalism, photography and mass communications have been three means to connect with people and help make this world better. The media is very powerful. It’s important that people not abuse and misuse it because people can be encouraged, informed, improved, and even hurt by what the media does.  Freezing life’s memories in a snapshot just thrills my heart. I am now loving retirement and sharing time with my grandchildren.

Any career advice you would give?    

~ Try the triple-H threat. Be honest to yourself and others, be happy and stay healthy.

~ Use this formula often: H1B1 – Help one, bring one along the way. Shared with me by my friend Cindy in Phoenix.

Which talent would you most like to have?

Besides playing the flute for eight years, I would love to have had drum and piano lessons.

If you could live anywhere, where would it be? 

Wichita, Kansas, my hometown because it is a good place to raise a family.

Wilma is telling Sanata her wish is for a great NFPW conference in her hometown of Wichita. She said the conference is going to be a rocking good time and she looks forward to seeing everyone soon.

Wilma is telling Sanata her wish is for a great NFPW conference in her hometown of Wichita. She said the conference is going to be a rocking good time and she looks forward to seeing everyone soon.

What book(s) are you reading?           

“United” by Corey Booker, “The Relevance of Religion: How Faithful People Can Change Politics,” by John Danforth, “The Butler: A Witness To History,” by Wil Haygood and “365 Read-Aloud Bedtime Bible Stories” to my grandchildren.

What would people be surprised to learn about you?

  1. That I was the 1973 Homecoming Queen at Kansas State University.
  2. Also, I graduated in three years with my first bachelor’s degree in 1973; I earned a 4.0 GPA while carrying 24 hours.
  3. That I have retired from Wichita State University as the associate director of Communication Upward Bound, and I’m working for a non-profit organization Maple Grove Heritage Association as the executive director and marketing coordinator.

Why is your affiliate and NFPW important to you?

Kansas Professional Communicators –  A statewide effort to promote the highest ethical standards in the communications field. Being involved offers the chance to really see and respect what the state offers by hosting annual conferences throughout the state. You can be as involved and step forward to share, learn and grow through KPC. I have enjoyed serving as a state president and other positions and working to promote the 2016 national conference.

NFPW – networking, traveling and maintaining professional development; presence for diversity as a person of color in the media. This national group offers an excellent opportunity for national recognition and from your peers of one’s work through the communications contest.

Way to follow you on a website, twitter, Facebook, etc.         

Facebook, email, LinkedIn or just call me—at work is fine. 316.682.4821; leave a message if I don’t answer.

 

Meet a Member: Tonda Rush

June 30, 2015

For the past 17 years, Tonda Rush has worked mostly behind the scenes supporting NFPW through efforts such as the First Amendment Network and financially through matching grants to help NFPW grow. She is one of the organization’s biggest fans. She is part of the American PressWorks team that manages NFPW. Without her support and guidance, NFPW would not be where it is today. She also works tirelessly on behalf of First Amendment issues. Meet this unique and unbelievable NFPW member I am honored to call a friend.

Tonda Rush

Tonda Rush

Name: Tonda Rush

City and State: Arlington, VA

Affiliate and any leadership positions: NFPW Executive Office since 1998

Years a member of NFPW: 40 next year

Tell us a little about you.

I am an unrecovered journalist. I began my career managing a small weekly newspaper, segued into daily newspaper reporting and then went to law school, with the intention of returning to the newsroom with the sheepskin that said I really did know how to report on the courts and crime. (I had been the cop shop reporter.) But before I got back on that track, I was recruited by Jack Landau to join the Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press to head up a project for reporters being kicked out of courtrooms after a bad 1979 Supreme Court decision. I acquired a passion for First Amendment advocacy there that I have used later in my work on the legal staff of American Newspaper Publishers Association and as CEO of the National Newspaper Association. After Carol Pierce and I formed American PressWorks, Inc., and began providing management services to NFPW, I conspired with Marsha Shuler to create the First Amendment Network (FAN) and we have been a thorn in the side of those who would govern in secret for all these years, we fervently hope.

During my law and management careers, I have continued to write, helping clients with newsletters, writing small books on public policy and ghosting speeches for our client Presidents and directors. I think when I retire, I may find some small owner-operated newspaper and go back to covering local government. Reporting was the most fun I ever had.

Any career advice you would give?  

Don’t wait until you are old to lose your aversion to risk. I did not start my own business until I was seeing my first gray hair. Should have done it much earlier.

Which talent would you most like to have?

Tunefulness. I am sure I was meant to be an opera singer, but I must have stood in the wrong line.

If you could live anywhere, where would it be?

Probably the mountains. Washington, DC, is built in a swamp. Unfortunately, it is where my work needs to be.

Tonda Rush, front right, enjoys a meal with NFPW members Betty Packard Voris, front row left; Carol Pierce, back row left; and Shayne del Cohen, top right.

Tonda Rush, front right, enjoys a meal with NFPW members Betty Packard Voris, front row left; Carol Pierce, back row left; and Shayne del Cohen, back row right.

What book are you reading?

At the moment, I am stuck on Louise Penny books. But I generally prefer historical fiction or readable biographies. Anything by David McCullough fascinates me.

What would people be surprised to learn about you?  

I crochet when I watch TV. It is hard for me to sit still that long otherwise.

Why is your affiliate and NFPW important to you?  

I have maintained a membership in the DC affiliate, but my heart belongs in Kansas.

Way to follow you on a website, twitter, Facebook, etc.

I am active on Facebook. Befriend me. Lawyers who represent the press in Washington need friends!

Meet a Member: Jill D. Miller

April 14, 2015

She awards semi-fabulous prizes to winners of different “get acquainted” games at NFPW conferences. As the “director of Fun” she takes her responsibilities seriously and members attending their first NFPW conference have a fun time getting to know other attendees. This redhead is a bundle of energy and makes conferences even more fun. Meet Jill D. Miller, a unique and unbelievable member I am glad to call a friend.

Jill D. Miller

Jill D. Miller

Name: Jill D. Miller

City and State: Wichita, Kansas

Affiliate and any leadership positions: Wichita Professional Communicators – Past President (2012)

Years a member of NFPW: 9 years (joined in 2006)

Tell us a little about you.

Jill D. Miller is a world champion plate spinner. With her independent business development consulting company, Creative Solutions, Jill has helped fledgling entrepreneurs launch out-of-the-ordinary and sometimes quirky new ventures, helped seasoned business owners see new possibilities and has kept freelancers motivated since 1998. As if that wasn’t enough, Jill started teaching entrepreneurship classes at Wichita State University in 2013, which she has found to be an exhilarating adventure of her plate-spinning prowess.

In her spare time, Jill likes to stay busy. She’s past president of Wichita Professional Communicators and is the Director of Fun on the board of the National Federation of Press Women. Deeply involved in the fundraising event, ArtAID, from 1993 to 2012, she helped raise nearly $2 million to help people in Wichita living with HIV and AIDS. Believing strongly in the importance of mom-and-pop businesses and how much they add to the community, Jill founded Cash Mob Wichita in 2012, gathering groups of shoppers to “mob” and spend money at local businesses. A bit of a social butterfly, Jill loves meeting new people and attending local art, music and theater events.

Any career advice you would give?

Jill D. Miller

Jill D. Miller

I’ve grown my business through word of mouth. I think the reason I’ve been a successful consultant is because I work hard to do business with integrity, network constantly to meet new people and grow relationships and belong to great professional organizations, like NFPW and Wichita Professional Communicators that keep me current with what’s happening in the world.

Which talent would you most like to have?

I’ve always wished I was better at drawing. I can picture what I’d like to draw, but the ideas just don’t come out on paper.

If you could live anywhere, where would it be?

I really like living in Wichita. If I had to move somewhere else I’d pick a bigger city to live in, like Denver, Chicago or Minneapolis.

What book are you reading?

Just finished “Playing Big,” by Tara Mohr. It’s about how women hold themselves back in business. Fantastic book.

What would people be surprised to learn about you?

I used to be a radio DJ on a college alternative radio show. That was a lot of fun!

Jill D. Miller

Jill D. Miller

Why is your affiliate and NFPW important to you?

The biggest reason my affiliate and NFPW are important to me is the people. I have made many great friends in the organization and feel we are an organization that will do all we can to help each other. I love that I have so many peers that I can ask for advice and support when I need it.

Way to follow you on a website, twitter, Facebook, etc.

Facebook: facebook.com/creativesolutions for business; facebook.com/jilldmiller for personal

Website: www.jilldmiller.com

Twitter: @jilldmiller

Linked In: http://www.linkedin.com/in/jilldmiller

Meet a Member: Deb Umberger

February 26, 2015
Deb Umberger

Deb Umberger on NFPW conference post-tour schooner excursion of Charleston Harbor in Charleston, S.C.

One of the advantages of NFPW pre and post tours is a chance to get to know members in a smaller group. I got to know Deb Umberger better on the Utah conference post-tour to the Moab, Utah area. It was a fun trip with a great group of people. I found she is a fun, talented and hard working member. She is another unique and unbelievable member I am glad to be able to call a friend.

Name: Deb Umberger

City and state: Wichita, Kansas

Affiliate and any leadership positions:

Wichita Professional Communicators:  scholarship chairwoman and president. I currently serve on the WPC board as past-president.

Kansas Professional Communicators: scholarship chairwoman. I have served as an appointed officer on the KPC board.

Years a member of NFPW: I’ve been a member for a while but am not sure how long. I may have started out as a local-only member of Wichita Professional Communicators.

WPC is the only local affiliate of Kansas Professional Communicators in the state of Kansas. WPC has more than 60 members and is a vibrant NFPW affiliate group. Local membership is a great way for potential members to join and get their feet wet. Local members are encouraged to consider full membership in KPC and NFPW so that they may enter contest and attend our state and national conferences at a reduced fee. WPC hosts monthly luncheon meetings at a lovely restaurant with guest speaker presentations on topics of interest to communicators. We also sponsor an annual wine and hors d’oeuvres mixer to raise funds for scholarships. We offer a scholarship competition for students majoring in communications at one of three local universities and a community college.

Deb Umberger, left, and Karen Jesse of Delaware Press Assn. in downtown Greenville, S.C., at the 2014 NFPW conference. Deb and Karen met in 2013 when they took “pot luck” for roommates for the NFPW conference post tour in Moab, Utah. They became good friends and roomed together again at the 2014 conference in Greenville, S.C.

Deb Umberger, left, and Karen Jesse of Delaware Press Assn. in downtown Greenville, S.C., at the 2014 NFPW conference. Deb and Karen met in 2013 when they took “pot luck” for roommates for the NFPW conference post tour in Moab, Utah. They became good friends and roomed together again at the 2014 conference in Greenville, S.C.

Tell us a little about you:

I came to the communications field through the back door. I’ve always liked to write and took as many English classes as I could in high school and college. My initial career goal was to be a counselor so I earned a degree in psychology from the University of Nebraska.  After college, I worked as a probation officer with the state district court. After getting married, I moved and began working for a hospital as an addictions counselor and program coordinator, and later a health promotions program coordinator. I did a lot of writing in both positions and ended up working for the Public Affairs and Marketing Department at the hospital.

I took about a 15-year hiatus from paid employment to raise my three children. My husband died suddenly when they were very young, so “soccer mom” became my full-time job title. We were living in Wichita by the time I returned to work when they were old enough to be at home alone after school without burning the house down. I worked for a succession of three nonprofits where I did communications and public relations. Due to budget cuts at my last employer brought on by an out-of-control governor, I was laid off two years ago. Since then I have enjoyed being retired. I’ve had requests to do some freelance writing — and plenty of requests to do it for free — but for the most part I’ve remained happily deadline free. 

Career advice:

Don’t waste too much time working in a toxic environment. You may have to stick it out for a while for financial reasons, but if you’re talented and have a good work ethic there are places to work where you will be appreciated.

Talent I’d most like to have:

I would love to be a dancer. Every time I attend a musical or dance performance, I wish I could be onstage with the dancers.

Where would I most like to live?

I could be happy living in a lot of places. Locations with beaches, warm weather, interesting culture, mountains, or traditional architecture all appeal to me. Last fall when I went on the NFPW post tour to Charleston, South Carolina, I totally fell in love with the city. It was tempting to just cash in my return airline ticket and stay there. Wherever I live, it’s most important to me to live within a day’s drive of my kids.

Deb Umberger and friend in downtown Greenville, SC, at the 2014 NFPW conference.

Deb Umberger and friend in downtown Greenville, SC, at the 2014 NFPW conference.

What book are you reading?

One of the joys of being retired is that I can stay up late reading novels. I recently finished “The Light Between Oceans” by M.L. Stedman and “Ordinary Grace” by William Kent Kruger. I just started reading John Grisham’s “Gray Mountain.”

At our WPC meetings we have drawings for gently used books donated by our members, to help raise money for our scholarship program. I get some good books there for the price of a couple of one dollar raffle tickets. Recently I won a book called “Attachments” by Rainbow Rowell. Rowell is an author from Omaha, where I used to live. The book was funny and fun to read since it was set in Omaha.

What would people be surprised to learn about you?

I’m related to Greta Garbo.

Also, I was locked in a jail cell once but, honestly, I was not the inmate. When I was a probation officer I went to visit a kid who was being held in a single cell because he was a juvenile. The jailer admitted me to the cell, said to knock on the door when I was finished, and slammed it shut. I’m quite sure this was not approved procedure. The kid was skinny and hung over and shorter than I was, so I figured I could beat him in a fist fight if it became necessary.

Why is your affiliate and NFPW important to you?

Writing can be a rather solitary occupation and I’ve always been a one-person communications department. Being able to associate with others who do the same kind of work has been so helpful. Being a member of NFPW and its local affiliates puts me in the company of experienced, smart, supportive, savvy people from whom I’ve learned a great deal. Membership has also given me opportunities to serve in leadership positions. I’ve made many friends through my association with NFPW and its Kansas affiliate group. Best of all, I’ve had a lot of fun attending WPC’s luncheons and fundraising mixers, and KPC’s and NFPW’s conferences. Despite being retired, I look forward to continuing to participate in all three groups.

Way to follow me? I’m on Facebook, using the name Deb Leffler Umberger

With a memorable name, Goudie continues to make her mark though books

May 21, 2014

 

She dishes regularly about books as a “Book Doctor” on the Kansas City NPR affiliate and her reviews have appeared in the New York Times and  other publications. She is a proven leader in her Kansas affiliate and NFPW. Meet another unique and unbelievable NFPW member who is full of optimism and curiosity and is as unique as her name — Jeffrey Ann Goudie.

Name: Jeffrey Ann Goudie

Jeffrey Ann Goudie

Jeffrey Ann Goudie

City and State: Topeka, Kansas

Affiliate and any leadership positions:

Kansas Professional Communicators. In the past I have served as East District Director (a position that no longer exists!) and 2nd Vice President/Bylaws and am winding down my second term as Secretary to transition into my second term as Historian. I was Kansas Communicator of Achievement in 2004.

Years a member of NFPW: 24 years

In a couple of paragraphs, tell us a little about you:

I am a long-time book reviewer, whose reviews have appeared in the New York Times Book Review and the Women’s Review of Books, but mostly in my regional paper of note, the Kansas City Star. I appear as a regular “Book Doctor” on KCUR, the Kansas City NPR affiliate (89.3 FM), to dish about books with fellow book critics. For many years I wrote a newspaper column, first for the Topeka Capital-Journal, then for the Topeka Metro News. I currently contribute commentary, mostly about Kansas politics and female politicians, to the Huffington Post. I also write profiles of interesting Topekans for Topeka Magazine.

I feel lucky to be able to do work that fills my need for novelty and satisfies my curiosity. I’m married to a fiction writer, Tom Averill, so I have an excellent editor who works across the study from me, separated by a tall double bookcase. This arrangement mostly works well, unless I talk too much, but he has a university office to retreat to.

I like it when my writing hits a nerve with readers, or crystallizes what they themselves are thinking. I’ve recently enjoyed writing for the Huffington Post — what it lacks in payment, it more than makes up for in readership. As a book reviewer, I gain a bit of secondhand glory when blurbs from my reviews appear on paperbacks. Yes, that’s me studying the backs of new trade paperbacks at Barnes and Noble.

Jeffrey Ann Goudie is a"Book Doctor" on KCUR, the Kansas City NPR affiliate

Jeffrey Ann Goudie is a “Book Doctor” on KCUR, the Kansas City NPR affiliate

Any career advice you would give?

My career advice comes from freelance writing, which many of our members do. With the freelance life, it’s either feast or famine. My advice would be to persist and persevere, despite rejection. One never knows when a piece that has been rejected by one publication will hit the sweet spot of an editor at a different publication on a new day.

Which talent would you most like to have?

In high school I took art for four years and entered the University of Kansas as a Fine Arts major, but never took a college art class. So perhaps like George Bush — not one of my political heroes, but who hails from my hometown of Midland, Texas — I will take up art in my retirement.

If you could live anywhere, where would it be?

I grew up in dusty, dry West Texas, and have always considered the northeast corner of Kansas where I live surprisingly lovely with its colorful, lush Springtime and its Fall-time deciduous trees. So where I’d want to live is right here, only with a new, progressive governor and a saner state legislature.

What book are you reading?

I’m actually rereading a lovely illustrated edition of William Strunk and E.B. White’s classic for writers, The Elements of Style. It has a Foreword by New Yorker writer Roger Angell (did you know he is the stepson of E.B. White?) and quirky and whimsical art by Maira Kalman.

What would people be surprised to learn about you?

Well, that I made an “F” in Home Economics, but that’s not surprising! Maybe that I had a baby at age 47. Alex is now a high school junior, and his sister, Ellie, a professional dancer, is 32.  Same marriage, just widely-spaced children.

Also, I have an unusual name for a woman, which I was always told was because my dad wanted to give me a memorable name. Several years ago another female Jeffrey contacted me.  She was named after Jeff Donnell, a B-grade movie actress who played George Gobel’s wife on television. When I related this story to my mother, she said, “Oh, yes, so were you.” So my name acquired a new backstory.

Why is your affiliate and NFPW important to you?

I joined NFPW and what was then Kansas Press Women in 1990. I was writing a column for the Topeka Capital-Journal at the time, and my editor encouraged me to join and enter my work in the communications contest. I did and won a first place in my state contest, and was hooked. I think of KPC and NFPW as part of my tribe. Many of the members, like me, started out working full-time in the daily newspaper business (I very briefly worked for the Parsons Sun and the Detroit Free Press) before finding work that was more flexible and conducive to family life, or just life. The organization is full of women propelled by optimism and curiosity, and it affords these strong women opportunities for support, recognition and leadership.

Way to follow you on a website, twitter, Facebook, etc.

I’m on Facebook.